It might be hard to remember with all that’s been going on in the past month, but as of Jan. 1, a new tax policy goes into effect. Many of us will not see many changes until we file their taxes in 2019, but the tax laws could not only impact our paycheck (for better or worse) they also have the potential to significantly alter home ownership incentives.

We can’t speak for individual paychecks, but as far as how the tax policies relate to real estate, we can offer a few insights.

  1. Reduced cap on mortgage interest deduction.

What it is: The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act reduced the limit for mortgage interest rate deduction for new loans to $750,000, starting Dec. 15, 2017. Loans that were taken before this date are grandfathered into the previous tax policy, which featured a $1 million cap on the deduction.

What it means: Homeowners who want to refinance their existing mortgage can do so up to $1 million and still be able to deduct the interest, however, the new loan cannot exceed the amount of debt being refinanced. Nationwide, this should only affect 1.3% of all mortgages, however, high-priced housing areas will feel the impact.

  1. New limits for state and local tax deductions.

What it is: While homeowners previously had an unlimited itemized deduction amount, under the new bill, they can only itemize deductions up to $10,000 for the total state and local property taxes and income or sales taxes. The cap is the same for both individual and married filers.

What it means: Households that itemize deductions and pay more than $10,000 in combined state and local taxes will get a smaller tax break, and for others, having a cap on deductions may be the deciding factor for some as to whether or not to itemize.

  1. Capital gains time frame excluded.

What it is: The previous capital gains tax policy, which stated that homeowners must live in the home for two out of the past five years in order to qualify for the exclusion, remains unchanged.

What it means: Sellers who live in their homes between two and five years can list their homes on a more flexible schedule without fear of a potentially hefty tax hit. (An original Senate bill had proposed an increase in the residency requirement to five years out of the past eight, but it did not make the final version.)

  1. Home equity loan deductions qualified.

What it is: Taxpayers will no longer be able to deduct interest paid on home equity loans beginning in 2018. Previously, there was a cap of $100,000 of home equity debt.

What it means: By taking away a low-cost financing option, many worry that owners will end up paying more for their loans, which could impact the home ownership rate make it more difficult for struggling communities to reinvent themselves. This shouldn’t impact the rate of home ownership but may affect home renovations.

  1. Standard deduction doubled.

What it is: The standard deduction for both single taxpayers and married couples filing separately used to be $6,350; that is being doubled under the new law to $12,000. Married couples filing jointly will see their previous deduction of $12,700 increase to $24,000.

What it means: This increase will most likely impact how many homeowners take advantage of their mortgage interest deduction. With a larger standard deduction and a decreased itemized deduction, many filers will no longer find it financially advantageous to itemize deductions. Under the current tax code, itemizing and claiming the mortgage interest deduction is financially worthwhile for about 44% of homeowners. Under the new law, itemizing and claiming the mortgage interest deduction will only be worthwhile for about 14.4% of homes nationwide.

Of course, it’s much to soon to tell how these new tax codes will affect anyone. According to research in the Wall Street Journal, it appears that taxpayers in high-cost areas (such as New York, San Francisco, Honolulu, and even Chicago) will feel much of the impact, and high-tax burdened markets will most likely receive a higher tax bill with the new limit. Low-tax states, however, may benefit from the new code.

Many thanks to RISMedia, realtor.com, and Zillow Research for the insight and analysis that contributed to this post. And many thanks to our CPA who proofed the piece for accuracy. 

If you have questions about the new tax code, and particularly how it will affect the Elmhurst housing market, please reach out to us. We’re here to help! Call (630) 441-5570 or visit www.gmregroup.com